Universal, universal one or of the universe - that's the meaning of Emma. So, that said, it was obvious I was destined to be a traveler. Or so I tell myself anyway. I'd never been overseas until I had my stroke, I was doing normal teenage 'stuff' like university, boyfriends and living for the weekend. Then, after my injury (although it's VERY cliche) I wanted to explore EVERYTHING. Experience EVERYTHING. Travel EVERYWHERE. Regardless of my disability, I knew I could find a way. Or a way around the hurdles. So I did.

18 countries (some 3 times each) down - and I'm FAR from stopping. There's been hiccups, some minor, some major. I've also had a whole lot of support in getting there.

Travel seems to be more accessible these days, compared to when I jumped on my first plane ride back in 2005. However, it is very intimidating when you've got a disability. Not just the accommodation, but the planning, flights and when you get there - accessible activities available. So I thought I'd share some of my adventures and tell you about the ups, the downs and the 'must-knows' of different destinations.

You'll find some tales of my adventures below.




There was no point to this holiday. I mean, no real objective. We didn't want to have an adventure, party, be inspired and culturally awakened or get 'loose' on local spirits (hello hospital visits) - we simply wanted to have 10 days of relaxation. We got it.



The Great Ocean Road is one of Australia's gems, and it's not hard to see why when going to distance in a classic Kombi! 



I joined my boyfriend half way through his holiday in Queenstown last year. He was over snowboarding with mates and I'm a little unsteadytredding through through sand - let alone snow.